Drop a couple pounds?

  • Is a prescription drug that contains a blend of amphetamines.
  • Can cause serious or even life-threatening side effects.
  • Will cause a positive result on a routine military drug test.

For more information, read the OPSS article about Adderall.

  • Is a substance found in chili peppers that gives them their spiciness.
  • Is commonly listed as “cayenne pepper” or “capsicum” on dietary supplement labels.
  • Is promoted for weight loss, but there isn’t enough evidence to support this claim.
  • In large amounts, might cause gastrointestinal issues for some people.
  • Is not prohibited for use by Military Service Members.

For more information, read the OPSS article about capsaicin.

  • In dietary supplements is often produced from the linoleic acid in safflower or sunflower oils.
  • Is promoted for fat and weight loss, but there isn’t enough evidence to support these claims. 
  • In supplements appears to be well tolerated, but gastrointestinal side effects have been reported.
  • Is not prohibited for use by Military Service Members.

For more information, read the OPSS article about CLA.

  • Is an unsafe stimulant not approved for use in dietary supplements.
  • Poses a risk of serious adverse events (heart attack, stroke, and death).
  • Despite being illegal, is still found in dietary supplements, usually ones for weight loss.
  • Is on the OPSS list of DoD-prohibited substances but will not cause a positive drug test.

If you would like more information, please read the OPSS article about ephedra.

  • Is a tree native to Southeast Asia and Africa that produces a small pumpkin-like fruit.
  • Rind contains hydroxycitric acid (HCA), which might impact appetite.
  • Is promoted for weight loss, but there isn’t enough evidence to support this claim.
  • Reports indicate some concern of liver damage.  
  • Is not prohibited for use by Military Service Members.

For more information, read the OPSS article about Garcinia cambogia.

  • Extract is often used as in dietary supplement products.
  • Is promoted for weight loss, but there isn’t enough evidence to support this claim.
  • Appears to be well tolerated in small amounts, short-term, but its long-term safety is unknown.
  • Is not prohibited for use by Military Service Members.

For more information, read the OPSS article about green coffee bean.

  • Is a hormone that women produce naturally during pregnancy.
  • Is produced synthetically for use as a drug and may be used only with a prescription.
  • Is not permitted for use in dietary supplements.
  • Is on the OPSS list of DoD-prohibited substances but will not cause a positive drug test.

For more information, please read the OPSS article about HCG.

  • Is a prescription drug used to promote weight loss by reducing your appetite. It is also a controlled substance.
  • Can cause a “false-positive screen” for amphetamine on a routine drug test (but not on confirmation testing).
  • Is not permitted for use by most branches of the military, but policies vary.

For more information, including links to service-specific policies, please read the OPSS article about Phentermine

  • Usually contain stimulant ingredients, many of which have been associated with serious side effects.
  • Sometimes contain ingredients prohibited for use by Military Service Members.
  • Sometimes contain potentially dangerous drugs not listed on the label.

Read the OPSS article about weight-loss supplements to learn more.

 

  • Bark and bark extract is often used in dietary supplement products.
  • Is promoted for weight loss and bodybuilding, but there isn’t enough evidence to support these claims.
  • Poses a risk for serious side effects.
  • Is not prohibited for use by Military Service Members.

For more information, read the OPSS article about yohimbe.