A list of commonly ask questions about supplements

  • Can raise your heart rate and blood pressure, potentially to dangerous levels.
  • Are common ingredients in pre-workout and weight-loss supplements, as well as energy drinks.
  • Include ingredients that are prohibited for use by Military Service Members.

Visit the OPSS article about stimulants for more information, including a list of common and prohibited stimulants.

  • Are dietary supplements marketed to enhance performance by raising your testosterone level.
  • Sometimes contain potentially dangerous or prohibited ingredients, controlled substances, or drugs.
  • Sometimes contain ingredients not listed on the label that could affect a drug test.

Read the OPSS article about testosterone boosters for more information.

  • Is most commonly used in “testosterone booster” and other performance-enhancement supplements.
  • Has not been shown to affect human testosterone levels or athletic performance.
  • Is not on the list of DoD-prohibited substances and will not result in a positive drug test.

To learn more, read the OPSS article about Tribulus terrestris.

  • Is an ecdysteroid (plant steroid) found in Ajuga turkestanica and other plants.
  • Is sometimes found in dietary supplements marketed for bodybuilding.  
  • Has little to no evidence of safety or effectiveness as a dietary supplement.
  • Is not prohibited for use by Military Service Members.
  • Is sometimes found in dietary supplements promoted for brain health.
  • Is a synthetic substance that, according to the FDA, does not meet the definition of a dietary ingredient.
  • Is a drug in some countries.  
  • Is prohibited for use by Military Service Members.
  • According to FDA, poses risks for women of childbearing age due to possible adverse reproductive effects.

For more information, read the OPSS article about vinpocetine.

  • Usually contain stimulant ingredients, many of which have been associated with serious side effects.
  • Sometimes contain ingredients prohibited for use by Military Service Members.
  • Sometimes contain potentially dangerous drugs not listed on the label.

Read the OPSS article about weight-loss supplements to learn more.

 

  • Bark and bark extract is often used in dietary supplement products.
  • Is promoted for weight loss and bodybuilding, but there isn’t enough evidence to support these claims.
  • Poses a risk for serious side effects.
  • Is not prohibited for use by Military Service Members.

For more information, read the OPSS article about yohimbe.