Performance & Bodybuilding

  • Are drugs that prevent the body from converting testosterone to estrogen.
  • Are used to treat certain types of cancer, primarily breast and ovarian cancer.
  • Are on the OPSS list of DoD-prohibited substances in dietary supplements.

Read the OPSS article about aromatase inhibitors

  • Vary widely in the kinds of ingredients they contain. Some are relatively safe, but others are not.
  • Sometimes contain hidden ingredients such as prescription drugs or steroids that pose serious health risks and could affect a drug test.
  • Like any other supplement, should not be used without first consulting a healthcare provider.

Read the OPSS article about bodybuilding and performance enhancement to learn more.

  • Can be effective for explosive, high-intensity activities, but not endurance activities.
  • Is available in many forms, but creatine monohydrate is the most studied form.
  • Should be used under the supervision of a qualified healthcare provider, such as a registered dietitian who specializes in sports dietetics.
  • In dietary supplements, look for ones with creatine monohydrate as the only active ingredient.

To learn more, read the OPSS article about creatine.

  • Is not approved by FDA as an ingredient in dietary supplements.
  • Is a synthetic stimulant that might not be safe.
  • Is known by a number of names, including AMP citrate, Amperall, 1,3-dimethybutylamine.
  • Is on the OPSS list of DoD-prohibited substances.
  • Might register on an initial military urine screening test for amphetamines, but will not cause a positive result on confirmation drug tests.

For more information, including other names for DMBA to watch out for, visit the OPSS article about DMBA.

  • Is a hormone naturally produced in the liver.
  • Is also produced synthetically for use as a drug and may be used only with a prescription.
  • Is on the OPSS list of DoD-prohibited substances but will not cause a positive drug test.

To learn more, please read the OPSS article about IGF-1.

  • Is a stimulant not allowed for use in dietary supplements.
  • Is also known as oxilofrine or p-hydroxyephedrine.
  • Is on the OPSS list of DoD-prohibited substances but will not cause a positive drug test.

For more information, read the OPSS article about methylsynephrine.

  • Are acceptable when high-quality foods are unavailable or not practical.
  • Sometimes contain protein from hemp, so know your service policy on hemp.
  • Might contain other kinds of ingredients you don’t necessarily want or need.

To learn more about protein supplements, read the OPSS articles about whey protein and hemp.

  • Are dietary supplements marketed to enhance performance by raising your testosterone level.
  • Sometimes contain potentially dangerous or prohibited ingredients, controlled substances, or drugs.
  • Sometimes contain ingredients not listed on the label that could affect a drug test.

Read the OPSS article about testosterone boosters for more information.

  • Is most commonly used in “testosterone booster” and other performance-enhancement supplements.
  • Has not been shown to affect human testosterone levels or athletic performance.
  • Is not on the list of DoD-prohibited substances and will not result in a positive drug test.

To learn more, read the OPSS article about Tribulus terrestris.

  • Is an ecdysteroid (plant steroid) found in Ajuga turkestanica and other plants.
  • Is sometimes found in dietary supplements marketed for bodybuilding.  
  • Has little to no evidence of safety or effectiveness as a dietary supplement.
  • Is not prohibited for use by Military Service Members.